ABOUT

REYoung was born in Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania and currently resides in a limestone cave deep beneath the city of Austin, Texas. He is the author of four novels: Unbabbling (Dalkey Archive Press, 1996), Margarito and the Snowman (Dalkey Archive Press, 2016), Inflation (TageTage Press, 2019), and the Ironsmith (TageTage Press, 2020).

APOCRYPHALYPSE

a conversation between book reviews

Is it true what they said?

He’s dead! He’s dead!

RIP, they said.

And the epitaph over his head?

“Unheralded,” it said.

“And, frankly, unread.”

But how? A bullet in the head?

Or peacefully in bed?

Ohh … so they should have said

Walking dead.


* * *

The Ironsmith is a brilliantly transgressive novel that exists in the interstices of time and space, simultaneously there and not there, the single extant copy passed “hand to hand” along a daisy chain of accidental readers gifted with internal quantum spectacles. Pure wizardry. (Disclaimer: the author of this review should not be confused with the author of this book.)

* * *



BLURBERY

UNBABBLING

"This experimental novel is broken up into three stories about living in a city's underworld. The first story focuses on a veteran named Harry who fills his life with booze and drugs so that his dream life and reality are woven into a world of paranoia. His life changes when he moves in with an artist named Cassa and rises in the corporate world, which proves to be as diabolical as his drug-induced dream world. The second story carries on this internal madness in the mind of a homeless man who creates an imaginary friend he calls Nakt to combat his desperate feelings of isolation and bare-bones survival. The third story is an absurd tale of a man named Erde who is forced to live underground as the world on the surface above him spins around in social chaos. Like the novels of Kenneth Patchen and the Russian Absurdists, this bizarre work rattles readers' sensibilities with a rich literary montage of the preposterous that carries with it a very strong social indictment of our times. Highly recommended for all collections."  David A. Berona, Univ. of New England, Biddleford, Me., Library Journal.
Copyright 1997 Reed Business Information, Inc.

"Ambitious and passionately written.... REYoung's style of compressing material is unique and viable; time passes so swiftly that events seem pancaked on one another." -- Harvey Pekar, Austin Chronicle


"REYoung unveils a social babble that masks the bankrupt spiritual and emotional quality of human existence.... It is a disturbing book, but it is disturbing because it effectively captures how the centrality of humanity has been wholly drowned out by the babble of money." -- Rain Taxi

"The enigmatic REYoung's Unbabbling reads like a wild romp through the subconscious of such esteemed modernists as Joyce, Pynchon, and Kerouac. REYoung has come virtually from nowhere to deliver this stunningly well-crafted novel.... It is the dynamic prose style that really makes the novel. REYoung alternates between a Pynchonesque vaudevillian satire to a tortured, rapid-fire stream of consciousness more typical of Jack Kerouac. A truly inspired piece of work." -- Booklist

MARGARITO AND THE SNOWMAN
"Turbo-charged lunacy, first-class wordplay, and a dangerously unhinged comic style blasts this insanely incoherent performance into the realm of the essential." Verbivoracious

"swirling kaleidoscopic streams of prose that smack of Pynchon channeling Kerouac." Austin Chronicle

"...a madcap, shaggy dog tale set along the U.S.–Mexico border. . . .Throw Under the Volcano into a blender with Cat’s Cradle, Finnegans Wake, Pedro Páramo, and the collected works of Charles Bowden, and you have something approaching REYoung’s latest." Kirkus Review

"This is the novel Hunter S. Thompson might have written had he not killed himself.” Steven Moore


THE IRONSMITH. A TALE OF OBSESSION, COMPULSION AND DELUSION
". . . muscular, visceral language. REYoung’s prose is like a bloodred wine, pungent with notes of “comic books and cartoons, fairytales, movies, songs, embedded myths and fantasies” .  .  . A study of obsession in exuberant prose." Steven Moore